The Soldiers Walk, Queens Domain, Hobart
 

 

Other Tasmanian Avenues - Cressy

Soldiers’ Avenue at Cressy

On Saturday afternoon Cressy was “en fete” the occasion being the planting of the Soldiers’ Avenue. Beautiful weather prevailed, and added much to the afternoon’s pleasure. Flags were flying from almost every residence and business place in the main street, while the large Union Jack belonging to the state school floated from the top of the Town Hall. At 2.30 the school children, headed by their fife and drum band, left the school grounds, under the head teacher, Miss Miller, and her staff, playing patriotic airs. After marching through the main street they were lined up in the front of the hall to await the arrival of the State Premier (Hon W H Lee) and the Warden of Longford (Mr J Freeland), who arrived by motor at 2.45, accompanied by Mrs Lee and Mrs Whitefield. The Warden, in welcoming the Premier to Cressy for the purpose of planting
THE FIRST TREE
said he was sure he voiced not only the feelings of his brother councillors but also of the whole of the Cressy people , when he took it as a great honour and pleasure that the ceremony should be opened by our own member , and he the Premier. the planting of the avenue would be a lasting tribute to those fallen soldiers who so gloriously died for their homes and the Empire, and ling monument to those brave fellows who return. Any relative or friend of any fallen soldier might on application obtain possession of any certain tree, and by taking care of it and affixing a tablet dedicate it to the fallen hero. The Premier, after expressing this gratification at being able to conduct the ceremony, said the planting of the avenue would mean the perpetuating of a lasting and glorious memorial to those gallant heroes of the district who had gone forth to fight shoulder to shoulder with their blood brothers of the British Empire, not only for the liberty of the devastated, hun-ravished Belgium, the
LIBERTY of AUSTRALIA
but the liberty of the whole world. Mr. Lee planted the first tree, while the band played “Onwards Christian Soldiers.” After this an adjournment was made to the hall for afternoon tea, which was presided over by the wife of the Warden (Mrs J Freeland), assisted by many local ladies. The hall, which was prettily decorated, had been arranged by Misses Miller, Sykes, and Nita Mason, and presented a very charming sight. Besides the Warden, other councillors present were: - Messrs C Titmus, W Brumby, T Archer, A Stokes, and E W Lawrence.

Weekly Courier August 15th 1918 p13

 

Soldiers’ Avenue Tree planting at Cressy

On Saturday afternoon Cressy was “en fete” the occasion being the planting of the Soldiers’ Avenue. Beautiful weather prevailed, and added much to the afternoon’s pleasure. Flags were flying from almost every residence and business place in the main street, while the large Union jack belonging to the state school floated from the top of the Town Hall. At 2.30 the school children, headed by their fife and drum band, left the school grounds, under the head teacher, Miss Miller, and her staff, playing patriotic airs. After marching through the main street they were lined up in the front of the hall to await the arrival of the State Premier (Hon W H Lee) and the Warden of Longford (Mr J Freeland), who arrived by motor at 2.45, accompanied by Mrs Lee and Mrs Whitefield.

The Warden, in welcoming the Premier to Cressy for the purpose of planting the first tree said he was sure he voiced not only the feelings of his brother councillors but also of the whole of the Cressy people , when he took it as a great honour and pleasure that the ceremony should be opened by our own member, and he the Premier. The planting of the avenue would be a lasting tribute to those fallen soldiers who so gloriously died for their homes and the Empire, and ling monument to those brave fellows who return. Any relative or friend of any fallen soldier might on application obtain possession of any certain tree, and by taking care of it and affixing a tablet dedicate it to the fallen hero. The Premier, after expressing this gratification at being able to conduct the ceremony, said the planting of the avenue would mean the perpetuating of a lasting and glorious memorial to those gallant heroes of the district who had gone forth to fight shoulder to shoulder with their blood brothers of the British Empire, not only for the liberty of the devastated, hun-ravished Belgium, the liberty of Australia but the liberty of the whole world. Many of those brave men had laid down their lives. They would not return to see this living monument of green trees, and it behoved every eligible young man who was fit and capable of service to go to those now fighting against such odds so that some of them at least might return to see this memorial. If, as we know the truth, that Australian battalions were now being verged [sic] into Imperial ones for want of reinforcements, how could we hope for that return, especially when we now that many of them had been constantly fighting for close on four with practically no rest whatever. Would not this thought appeal to some of the young men of the municipality and induce them to go forward and hang together, and die together, until German militarism was crushed? America had come to our assistance. What if she had not? Australia and every true Australian must stick to the promise made. Only by doing that could our battalions be kept intact and our honour upheld. Another war loan would shortly be issued, and the promise made would be so kept. Those were the loads the men of Australia must carry; the women were doing great work, in particular, the Red Cross. People would be more generous to this cause if they fully realised the great work done and how much more was needed. On the 21st, when an American tea would be held in this hall, the funds would go to the French Red Cross. This could be our mite to that great ally’s noble cause.
The Warden proposed a vote of thanks to the Premier; also to Miss Miller, which was carried with applause.

The Premier responded on behalf of Miss Miller and himself. Mr. Lee then planted the first tree, while the band played “Onward Christian Soldiers.” After this an adjournment was made to the hall for afternoon tea, which was presided over by the wife of the Warden (Mrs J Freeland), assisted by many local ladies. The hall, which was prettily decorated, had been arranged by Misses Miller, Sykes, and Nota Mason, and presented a very charming sight. Besides the Warden, other councillors present were:- Messrs. C Titmus, W Brumby, T Archer, A Stokes, and E W Lawrence.
From information gleaned from Mr. Freeland after the planting had finished, it was learned that all the cost of the trees is borne by the council, and not as some imagined by public subscription. Many workers made light labour, and the sixty trees were planted and guards erected before 5 o’clock, and a pleasant send-off accorded to the Premier and Mrs Lee, who were motored to Longford by Mr. C Titmus, this being rendered necessary by a double blow-out of the tyres of the Warden’s car – a Premier and a Warden had proved too weighty! Sweets and cordials were distributed to the children, and were the gift of the Warden.

Examiner August 13th 1918 p3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Acknowledgements

 

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